Sci-FI, Ecology, and Philosophy: The Merging of Ideas

As some of you may know, I had my science fiction novel, Ezekiel’s Brain accepted for publication by NewLink Publications, a small-press sci-fi publisher. It’s a philosophical novel about artificial intelligence, which first threatens and then exterminates the human race, then continues to populate the solar system with new AIs. It probably won’t be out until late 2020 and the publisher has first option on a sequel and has asked for one, so I’m putting together ideas for it. I’m also working on a paper for the Western Division of the American Philosophical Association on “Philosophy in Popular Fiction.” As part of my research on both of these projects, I’m reading lots of philosophical and sci-fi novels. It’s amazing how much the two genres overlap. The great classics in sci-fi, which I regard as Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy, Herbert’s Dune, Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land, and LeGuin’s, The Left Hand of Darkness, are known to have a philosophical bent, but so do almost all of the novels of Philip K. Dick. I’ve discovered Heinlein’s Starship Troopers and Haldeman’s The Forever War, both of which make powerful, and opposite, statements about the military and war. Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael, while not usually classified as sci-fi, very well could be, given its main character being a highly intelligent gorilla who teaches a human lessons about how our cultural mindset leads us to destroy our own planet. Along with books, such as Ernest Callenbach’s  futuristic, Ecotopia, Ishmael addresses the destruction of our planet and how a different philosophy about man’s place in nature could lead to a different outcome.

My upcoming novel, Ezekiel’s Brain includes some eco-sci-fi themes, although that isn’t its main focus. A few years back I wrote a novel called, The Peacemaker, which I subtitled, “An Ecological Science Fiction Novel.” The Peacemaker is about the destruction of a planet by overpopulation and overindustrialization with no care for the environment as its central theme —that and the destructiveness of war—and it shows genuine ways out of our environmentally destructive way of living, although the novel is based on twin planets, neither of which are Earth. I’ve always offered The Peacemaker at the ridiculously low price of $0.99 as a Kindle book and the paperback for only  $13.95, so that it would reach as many readers as possible.  For the next few days, I’m slashing the prices of these books even more so my fans and newsletter subscribers can get them at little or no cost. I’ve reduced them as far as Amazon will allow. For three days only, the Kindle edition of The Peacemaker will be FREE on Amazon. The paperback will be reduced by $5.00 to just $8.95!

If you like sci-fi or are interested in ecology and saving the planet, this is your chance to get a groundbreaking novel, based on the twin disciplines of Deep Ecology and Biomimicry for nothing or next to nothing!  Don’t miss this opportunity.

The Peacemaker can be found at Peacemaker on Amazon

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